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Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Federal Buildings Personnel Training Act of 2010 passed

AFE (Association for Facilities Engineering) writes about the Federal Buildings Personnel Training Act of 2010 being passed.


AFE envisions the legislation as a way for the Federal government to model best practices in the operation and maintenance of high efficiency buildings systems. "By passing this legislation, the federal government will demonstrate by correctly maintaining high performance buildings, huge savings in energy and water costs can be achieved," he said. "But those dividends can only be attained when appropriately trained workers maintain high efficiency buildings at peak performance levels."

Read full article at AFE site, click AFE: Latest News


Don (Follow me on Industrial Skills Training Blog and on Twitter @IndTraining .)

Sunday, December 26, 2010

Electrical Preventive Maintenance Will Keep You Safe and Warm

This series of post; "Electrical Preventive Maintenance Will Keep You Safe and Warm" are guest post by Stuart Smith, MBA, MS. He is an avid writer about CMMS and EAM software solutions for Mintek Mobile Data Solutions. Stuart has over 25 years experience running operations in multiple industries. Stuart will have sevral post in the folowing weeks to cover Electrical PM, so please follow our blog to keep up to date on this topic.

Electrical Preventive Maintenance Will Keep You Safe and Warm
By Stuart Smith

With much of the nation buried under mountains of snow or enduring freezing temperatures, now is the time to make sure that your industrial facilities have been inspected for potential electrical problems. Without proper preventive maintenance on your electrical systems, disaster can happen before you have time to thaw.

Why Perform Preventive Maintenance on Electrical Systems

During the winter months, power requirements are higher for many industries as facilities struggle to keep buildings warm and their assets in operation. In addition, in today's economic environment, facility and plant managers also struggle with efforts to lower power consumption in order to reduce expenses.

Training and specialized equipment such as programmable logic controllers (PLC) can only help so much. All of the above goals contribute to a variety of issues that includes but is not limited to:

Ten Reasons to Perform Electrical Preventive Maintenance

◦Avoid electrical shorts that cause fires: Electrical short circuits can occur when wires are overloaded with current, wires are exposed and load imbalances. This can cause excessive heat buildup, arcing or explosions.

◦Identify loose connections: Loose connections can cause power fluctuations to devices, devices to operate erratically and uneven load distribution between wires.

◦Identify components running hot or not according to specifications: Transformers, motors, bearings and wires almost always run hot before they fail. Predictive maintenance technologies such as infrared thermography, vibration analysis and laser alignment tools as well as general maintenance such as regularly scheduled lubrication can avoid asset failure.

◦Identify unusual smells, noises, dust build up, or discoloration: Melting insulation, stressed motors, corrosion through dust and so on make a physical inspection a requirement for electrical components. Electrical troubleshooting should be performed using a systematic approach.

◦Check all emergency lighting, signage and power indicator displays: Many electrical disasters occur when the safety monitoring equipment itself is faulty leading to a false belief that all is ok.

◦Extend the useful lifecycle of assets: Poorly maintained assets require more energy to do the same amount of work. This leads to excessive wear and tear and a shortening of the assets useful lifecycle.

◦Avoid unplanned downtime: Unplanned downtime can shut down production, result in emergency labor costs and unnecessary capital asset replacement. Without proper electrical training, all of these significantly impact the profitability of the organization.

◦Less equipment loss: Consistent electrical preventive maintenance will reduce the amount of equipment that needs to be replaced early as a result of electrical problems.

◦Energy savings: Optimal energy efficiency will occur when equipment is functioning within design parameters and is well maintained.

◦Safety and Liability: The most important reason of all is safety. Avoiding serious injuries or death is worth every penny spent on prevention. Liability lawyers have a field day when facilities have a poor maintenance record.

Please Follow this blog to see the next post in this series titled "How Often Should Electrical PM be done?"

Also if you find this post useful, please share with others using the social media buttons, and your comments below are always appreciated.

About the post author Stuart Smith, MBA, MS: Stuart is an avid writer about CMMS and EAM software solutions for Mintek Mobile Data Solutions.

Thursday, December 16, 2010

Your Next Captial Equipment Purchase

Advice: Get advice.

 Get advice from an independent-unbiased consultant before you purchase new capital equipment (Machines, production equipment, automation, etc.)

Example, don’t rely on equipment provider and OEM only. Before making any decisions, signing any agreements, seek out a non-related and non-competitive consultant or training company and ask their advice.

An OEM may sell you on the notion you need the most expensive equipment, or new technology that can often cost you more in support and downtime.

Ask the questions

  • Does the application need this level of technology?
  • Will it make us OEM dependant?
  • Do we have staff trained to maintain, make minor modifications?
  • Is the system cost effectively expandable? Does it really need to be expandable?
  • Will we have access to ALL programs, documentation, needed software?
  • Will the project require ongoing support cost? How Much?
  • Is the process secure from malicious abuse? (Can it be easily accessed remotely by unauthorized persons?)
  • What is the turnaround time to get on-site service tech? At what cost?
Examples from those who have not sought out an independent consultant first

“Paid $10k+ plus for process automation controller to move a press up and down, when a simple PLC for less than $1K would have been just fine.”
“OEM upgrades firmware version on our system, so our software no-longer works requiring us to call OEM when ever even minor modifications are needed or to troubleshoot.”

“Vendor refuses to provide schematics or documented PLC program so we can troubleshoot in-house.”

“It takes 3 days to a week to get service tech in to troubleshoot.”

“Someone got into our machine via the phone modem connected to machine, and corrupted the program, shutting us down.”

“We are trained on PLCs, but the vendor used a PAC to control with C++, now we need a computer programmer to troubleshoot and modify.”

And the most popular … “We are not trained on that.”, “We don’t have schematics, software or documented copy of program.”
  
And the list of horror stories go on. Please help others out and use the comment area below to tell your personal stories of how a new project cost you more than necessary upfront or after start-up. So we all can learn and avoid future headaches. Thanks for your help.

Don (Follow me on Industrial Skills Training Blog and on Twitter @IndTraining .)

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Recomended Training for the Maintenance Electrician

These training solutions are in order we recommend you send you employees through them...


V4 Electrical Troubleshooting Skills Series (3 separate training programs that increase in skill level required and vary circuits worked with.) The single PC/Workstation Enterprise edition is $1595 allows unlimited users, one user at a time. (We do have more expensive packages with 5 PC/Workstations allowed to use simultaneously, and more workstation versions.)

(Software details and demos http://www.bin95.com/electrical_software_downloads.htm )

Also you might want to follow up the above 3 software programs with the FPS 3000 Advanced Troubleshooting Software http://www.bin95.com/Training_Software/fluid_process_systems.htm

(Network packages for multiple users at https://www.bin95.com/ebooks/education_corporate_pricing.htm )

The next logical course for your people after sharpening their troubleshooting skills, is PLCs. We provide PLC training in every imaginable form, so each customer can find what works best for their particular situation. To have the best possible trained people on PLC, we recommend they first attend our 3 day public seminar or 5 day customized on-site PLC training, to get real world hands on knowledge and a safety/reliability focused foundation.
http://www.bin95.com/plc_training.htm

Then they should follow up with our complete PLC training solution the 10 DVD PLC Training Video Course Series for $2289 unlimited users at http://www.bin95.com/Industrial-Training-Videos/plc_training_videos.htm This will allow them to go through each of the 10 dvds at their own leisure.

We also have other limited PLC training options should you your budget be constrained or you want additional follow up for your people, 6 months after taking the above courses. We have a 2 CD PLC training set for $160 per user http://www.bin95.com/ebooks/plc_training_simulator.htm or the unlimited user version for $999 https://www.bin95.com/ebooks/education_corporate_pricing.htm This 2 CD set is in no way a replacement for the above courses as they only teach a few basic instructions, and specifically Allen Bradley’s RSLogix 500 software/PLC. But the simulation CD that comes in this set provides many hours/days of particle experience while employee writes ladder logic to make each of the simulations work.

Just as the V4 software increases troubleshooting experience quicker than you could obtain in regular job duties, the PLC simulation software increases PLC programming experience quicker that you could obtain in regular job duties.

Some customers also supplement the above training with our PLC training equipment so employees can get more hands on experience. It sells for $269 per unit. http://www.bin95.com/Training_Equipment/plc_equipment.htm

We also offer many (100+) training software programs that target specialized areas of electrical training. You may browse our order form at https://www.bin95.com/ebooks/order_book_online.htm for complete list. Some topics I would recommend from the above list are …
  • 10 DVD Electrical Training Video Library w/ Instructor guide and workbook
  • Electrical Safe Work Practices Computer Based Training CD
  • AC Motor Controls CBT CD
  • Hazardous Area Instrumentation Training Software (Download)
  • VFDTrainer Freq Drive Training Software CD
  • CLXTrainer ControlLogix Training Software CD
  • The ViewTrainer HMI (RSView32) CD
 If you would like a quote for our on-site PLC training and/or any of the above courses, please let me know which ones you have decided on and your full contact information so we can generate you the needed quotes.

Don (Follow me on Industrial Skills Training Blog and on Twitter @IndTraining .)

Friday, October 8, 2010

DCS or PLC, wich is most commonly used?

On our LinkedIn Process Control group discussion, I commented ...
'The fact that even if DCS can be used, is it commonly being used for a particular applications'


And I would like to share these informative comments with our Blog readers.
I have been in hundreds of manufacturing facilities, from all industries types, hardly ever see a DCS system being used, just PLCs.

Another good point previously made in the process control discussion group , is that "hybrid" PLC (actually called a PAC, Process Automation Controller like the AB Controllogix), will make the need for complicated, difficult to support, expensive DCS systems even less common.

According to Frost & Sullivan market report titled “World Distributed Control System (DCS) Market”, SCADA systems are offering even more competition to DCS vendors, because they cost only a fraction of the price of a DCS system. The report also mentions power, chemical plants and oil refineries as traditional DCS users.

Although the summary I read was Feb, 2010, I did not see mention of PAC with SCADA in the market analysis, just PLC – SCADA. But logically the PAC – SCADA would take away from DCS market even more. (“logically”, ha. No pun intended. :>)

Please comment with which you see out there the most, and what industries? Thanks


Don (Follow me on Industrial Skills Training Blog and on Twitter @IndTraining .)

Friday, September 17, 2010

To make Manufacturing Sexy (appeal to more people).

Maintenance Women

Below are my comments in reply to an excellent topic and video Karin Lindner started on our LinkedIn Industrial Discussion Group, I would like to share with you.

Below are two proven examples where Engineering are made "Sexy" (interesting to the younger crowd, not nothing to do with sex actually:>)


Ex 1: with 9000+ comments, this video using multiple methods to make engineering cool and attract the young, see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjGrHBpfqCo

(Elements of social media, action, video, gaming done in quality way. Plays on the already popular.)

Ex 2: Music video, cost less than full blown movie like Ironman, so more could be made at same cost of one hit movie, reaching more people. see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y0DxmthvkKU

(Elements of social media, music, video, cool technology. Needs more marketing though, so share this video with others. :>)

Especially those in school, we need more presence on TV and more manufacturers evolved in grade school on up. Watch Karin's video below and see more great manufacturing related videos at http://www.youtube.com/user/bin952 (click on the subscribe button and be sure to view the many Playlist, by clicking on that button.)
Karin's Video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_opbsacGvjg

After reviewing the above material, please reply to this post or join in the LinkedIn Industrial Discussion Group and let me know your toughts and opinions. We all would realy like to here them.

Thank you for your support.

Don (Follow me on Industrial Skills Training Blog and on Twitter @IndTraining .)

Thursday, August 26, 2010

Reduce Downtime Troubleshooting!


Actually it does not matter if you have hardwired, Modbus, Devicenet or wireless sensors as far as troubleshooting time goes. (although any of the above can add to number of problems to be found. Like Modbus communication going out.)


The two primary factors in troubleshooting with a PLC is training and documentation. Using a PLC, it typically takes 5-10 minutes for a properly trained technician with discriptored ladder logic and an electrical layout diagram, to find a problem, no matter how complex the system. Time to fix varies on actual problem found.

Items that can increase troubleshooting time in order of most negative effect are ...

  • · Lack of proper training.
  • · Lack of proper PLC program documentation.
  • · Over complicated PLC ladder logic.
  • · Lack of electrical layout and schematics.

  • System Designs in order of most timely to troubleshoot are ...

  1. DCS (Mostly proprietary and designed for only OEM to use.)
  2. SCADA (Often proprietary, non-user friendly and training deficiencies. Seek Wonderware® and Factorytalk® training.)
  3. PAC (Ladder Logic easy, but function block diagram is not always, structured text is a more complex computer programming language.)
  4. PLC (Ladder Logic, easy for electricians and mechanics too if tought properly.)
The bottom line is that all the above systems could be easy (quick) to troubleshoot if one is constantly trained, the system is well documented and designed for the laymen to easily understand.


Don (Follow me on Industrial Skills Training Blog and on Twitter @IndTraining .)

Saturday, August 21, 2010

What is world-class asset management?

Check out this Industrial Training Newsletter and comment on it below. What do you define as world-class asset management?

Sunday, August 1, 2010

PLC Programming Jobs

Click www.flickr.com/photos/manufacturing/4848858001/ to see large ladder logic
Below are some tips for those looking for PLC Programming Jobs. I suggest those looking for PLC programming jobs AND those who are looking for PLC Programmers (single project or full time job), connect with me. In the online social media arena, I am well connected within our industry. Just by following, friending, connecting with me, you will add to your visibility in our industry. http://www.linkedin.com/in/bin95

If you would also like to connect on facebook, see http://www.facebook.com/Eelectrician.Engineer.Industrial.Training

Also, I know I have mentioned it before, but we have http://www.twitter.com/IndTraining set up to automatically find related jobs as soon as they are posted on the Internet somewhere, and tweet them to you. So I would recommend following @IndTraining too.

But, on to advice for finding PLC Programming jobs. first of all, study the rung of PLC logic above, it speaks your language. :>) the ladder logic may also give you some insight into areas you can open more contacts. (Pun intended) The old school method of looking for jobs in search engines, even older school method of live networking events, calling each manufacturer/engineering firm, snail mail, classifieds are equal to a slow boat to China nowadays.

You need to get social, that was my advice to a friend recently, seeking PLC Programming job. This is the only way in today's world, to find the jobs quick, before someone else does. Below are excerpts from my reply to William W. (if you need a good programmer, contact me, I'll send you William's resume.)

  • Get on FaceBook, I am connected with 50+ manufacturers, make a post letting them know you are seeking a job.
  • Create a detailed contact profile/resume on LinkedIn, I am connected with 350+ in the industry, you could be too.
  • Today, smart employers want Internet savvy PLC programmers, be smart, get up to speed and get online.
More from my reply to William ...
"... Search the jobs posted on LinkedIn.com you will find ones like Controls Engineer - Manufacturing Engineering Group at Intralox posted by Kathy 4 days ago.


Or Lead Electrical Design Engineer at Bauer Controls posted by Kelly today. (you want to sort your search by day posted, and reply to the jobs most recently posted first, and work your way down to the older job listing. If you are contacting a company through LinkedIn where they can see all your information, you are more likely to get an interview than if you just cold call some company, not having a person within the company to contact.

Also if you find yourself with a lot of time on your hands, you should post frequently to related discussions like those at …

http://www.automation.com/career-job-center/job-pages/search-for-jobs?page=search  (Rick Zabel
is VP and is a connection of mine on LinkedIn.com (most of the major site owners are connections of mine. And could be yours too. :>)

http://www.plcs.net/classifieds/employoffer.html
http://forums.mrplc.com/
http://www.indeed.com/q-PLC-Technician-jobs.html
http://www.automationtechies.com/job-seekers
http://www.careerbuilder.com/JobSeeker/Jobs/JobResults.aspx?

The links above are to job areas, but you want to join in on the regular discussion groups to establish yourself online as an expert. (ending with your signature stating you are seeking employment.:>)

The bottom line, using google search for “plc technician jobs” and “plc programmer jobs” to find the hundreds of jobs out there, you should try to apply/inquire for at least 10 jobs per day.


Don (Follow me on Industrial Skills Training Blog and on Twitter @IndTraining .)

Friday, July 16, 2010

US Machine Shop Profiled on CNN




Today's Light-Blue Collar worker in manufacturing. It is all about training and thinking, not just repetitious unskilled factory work. Prepare for the future, your future, and get as much education as you can. Others can do the mindless low-skill and low-pay work.

Don (Follow me on Industrial Skills Training Blog and on Twitter @IndTraining .)

Monday, July 12, 2010

Maintenance Songs - WGHP

Great interview with my good frend Joel Leonard showing how his maintenance songs could have avoided the BP oil spill. (Maintenance Songs - WGHP) If only everyone would listen. They need to listen to Joel's full story too. The songs are just the tip of the ice berg.

Don (Follow me on Industrial Skills Training Blog and on Twitter @IndTraining .)

Thursday, July 8, 2010

How to to Break into the Industrial Maintenance side of Electrical Contracting?

My reply to a question often asked of us by electrical contractors. How to break into the Industrial Maintenance side of Eelectrical Contracting? What training will help?

First of all I would like to point out an article we have about changing over to industrial Electrical, if you haven’t already read it. http://www.bin95.com/Residential_Electrician.htm

If you like it, please click the FaceBook like button. :>)

Now for the training. If you want the very best, and can afford it, you should start with the 10 DVD Industrial Electrical Course. This will get you oriented with the ‘Industrial’ side of things. (Nema motor starters, drives, solenoids, etc. basics) You should follow that with the "Advanced
Troubleshooting Industrial Controls Simulation Training Software
” to improve your industrial troubleshooting skills. You may want to supplement the electrical training with one or more other electrical training software we sell like one on AC motors or Electrical safety.

Then we recommend to existing industrial (commercial) electrical contractors, that they learn PLCs to increase their company’s capability and number of contracts received. For this you need the 10 DVD PLC training course. We offer additional PLC training in every conceivable media (online course, CDs, trainer, etc.), so you can become the best in the industry if that is your desire.

You would typically follow the above recommendations with Niche and more advanced training, like
Hazardous Electrical areas training
, PID Training, Etc.

Don (Follow me on Industrial Skills Training Blog and on Twitter @IndTraining .)

Friday, July 2, 2010

Industrial Automation Control Standards

There are 3 areas of PLCs in need of standards. They are design, networking security, and procedures (working with PLCs).

  • The design and PLC programming standards are covered in IEC 1131
  • The Networking Security standards are covered in ANSI/ISA-99
  • The ‘Working with PLCs’ procedure recommendations are covered in PLC Management
Hope this helps us all in the automation control industry get on the same page.

Don (Follow me on Industrial Skills Training Blog and on Twitter @IndTraining .)

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Troubleshooting PLC SCADA systems.

This is in reply to a discussion on CR4 where the commentor suspected sensor wiring method to be root cause of extended troubleshooting time. My reply below...

Actually it does not matter if you have hardwired, Modbus, Devicenet or wireless sensors as far as troubleshooting time goes. (although any of the above can add to number of problems to be found. Like Modbus communication going out.)


The two primary factors in troubleshooting with a PLC is training and documentation. Using a PLC, it typically takes 5-10 minutes for a properly trained technician with discriptored ladder logic and an electrical layout diagram, to find a problem, no matter how complex the system. Time to fix varies on actual problem found.

Items that can increase troubleshooting time in order of most negative effect are ...

  • Lack of proper training.
  • Lack of proper PLC program documentation.
  • Over complicated PLC ladder logic.
  • Lack of electrical layout and schematics.

System Designs in order of most timely to troubleshoot are ...

  • DCS (Mostly proprietary and designed for only OEM to use.)
  • SCADA (Often proprietary, non-user friendly and training deficiencies. Seek Wonderware® and Factorytalk® training.)
  • PAC (Ladder Logic easy, but function block diagram is not always, structured text is a more complex computer programming language.)
  • PLC (Ladder Logic, easy for electricians and mechanics too if taught properly.)

The bottom line is that all the above systems could be easy (quick) to troubleshoot if one is constantly trained, the system is well documented and designed for the laymen to easily understand.

For click link for additional >>>  PLC Training
For click link for additional >>> PAC Training


Don (Follow me on Industrial Skills Training Blog and on Twitter @IndTraining .)

Saturday, June 26, 2010

Controllogix 5000 Training

Check out this Controllogix 5000 training SlideShare Presentation: and our many others.

Wait, click the follow button on left hand side of screen so you know when more arrive.

Monday, June 14, 2010

CSI? No … BSI (Breakdown Scene Investigation)

BSI: Breakdown Scene Investigation


It’s not a Crime Scene Investigation (CSI:), but a lot like it. It is a BSI: (Breakdown Scene Investigation), a bit more complicated and technical. Both require control over the scene and the basic scientific investigation technique. Both are often a race against time. The differences being most CSI: shows investigate loss of life, with BSI: loss of production. (Hopefully the machine breakdown this time is just loss of production and money, not actually hurting someone.) The equipment used by the BSI: ‘Agents’ is different too. Usually one or two of the investigators are PLC Techs using a laptop to access the computer that controls machines, called a PLC (Programmable Logic Controller).

First let’s set the BSI: scene above… The girl and guys on far left wearing black BIN PLC Tech hats are holding laptops, the PM Tech lady grabbed a spare PLC module out of the store room, just in case. The mechanic has his tool box. On the far right, is the plant manager who thinks his presence somehow, will speed the repair of the machine? A few operators are standing around as onlookers. Hopefully one of the PLC Techs are questing the operators as witnesses, while breakdown scene is first being secured. The man in the very back could be the production line supervisor.

The cost of all these employees (experts) and the lost production is running at about $10,000 per hour. The clock is ticking, tic-toc!

The maintenance crew has scientific procedures at their disposal too. They don’t just use wrenches, grease guns, volt-ohm meters and laptops. They can chose to use Root Cause Analysis (RCA), Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FEMA), data analysis tools such as Cpk, SPC, MTBF, PdM, etc. Also they use the most basic and common; non-invasive test, operating and condition monitoring.

The Investigation process:

1. Secure the Breakdown scene.

2. Talk to machine operators (expert witnesses).

3. Take pictures and other data collection. (Maybe actual photographs, but more importantly a copy of the PLC program which preserves the state of all switches, sensors, etc. for later analysis.)

4. Use PLC ladder logic to quickly find machine problem and to minimize downtime.

5. Repair problem, get machine back into production.

6. Perform RCA, PdM etc. for future breakdown prevention.

Don (Follow me on Industrial Skills Training Blog and on Twitter @IndTraining .)

Sunday, April 25, 2010

10 Free Maintenance Training Flyers

Thank you for being a friend


These maintenance training flyers below are free to all who follow us on Twitter, Friends on Facebook etc. Our way of saying thank you. The more people who follow us, the more free maintenance training flyers we will add. So please ask your maintenance, engineering, manufacturing and other industrial related friends to follow us.


Not following us yet?
Please choose your poison...


Right click link below, choose "Save Target As" to save file to your computer.
Warning: These flyers are only for our friends and followers and are copyright protected. You may NOT distribute the files below.

111 Protecting bearings from dust & water

115 Maintenance costs capital moneys


122 Ultrasonic level detectors


123 Chemical corrosion control


262 Electric motor problems


275 Helical rotor pumps - benefits and limitations


323 Tools to Focus on Plant Reliability


344 Control Loops - Masters of Automatic Control


364 Rolling bearing vibration detection


1101 Job descriptions tell tradesmen



The above Flyers are from our CD with 150 Maintenance training flyers on it.
If you want to see what free maintenance flyers might come up in the future, or want to purchase all 150 today, please see the product page below.
Don (Follow me on Industrial Skills Training Blog and on Twitter @IndTraining .)

Monday, April 19, 2010

Can Engineering News be entertaining?

You bet. Take a break from the job world and watch this series of videos on YouTube titled ... "This Week In Engineering". Great stuff. The latest Engineering News made both interesting and entertaining.
(Be sure to comment on videos so Engineering.com keeps this video series going.)

Thank you for your consideration.
Don (Follow me on twitter @indtraining, add me to your LinkedIn network)
Business Industrial Network
www.BIN95.com
BIN95 @ BIN95.com

Saturday, April 10, 2010

How the U.S. can Enhance its Advanced Manufacturing Capability

President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) asked in their new public forum OpenPCAST ...
"What are your ideas as to how the U.S. can enhance its advanced manufacturing capability."

My reply to them is below...

With the baby boomers retiring, our country’s manufacturing productivity is at great risk if we do not train maintenance and engineering on PLC (Programmable Logic Controllers) and other automation from a safety and reliability approach.

Not only does this PLC training crisis affect manufacturing, but also the maintenance and operation of the entire USA infrastructure. (PLCs control all city water, power, building controls like elevators and some bridges, tunnels, hospital equipment, farm production equipment, etc..)

Most organizations only have 1 “PLC guru”, and often they have only had text book, community college training, or figured it out on their own. Most have not had training on the safety, reliability and management of PLCs like BIN95.com delivers.


Don
(Follow me on Industrial Skills Training Blog and on Twitter @IndTraining .)

Thursday, April 1, 2010

Developing Competencies and Skills - employment growth 2010

Developing Competencies and Skills - employment growth 2010

Developing competencies open roads to worker productivity in the workplace, employability, and sustainable development.This article by Armando Justo points out competency based training to improve employee skills will be key differentiators for future success of organizations and countries alike. so please for article link to all you know.

Don
(Follow me on Industrial Skills Training Blog and on Twitter @IndTraining .)

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Free Maintenance Training Flyers

Thank you for being a friend


These maintenance training flyers below are free to all who follow us on Twitter, Friends on Facebook etc. Our way of saying thank you. The more people who follow us, the more free maintenance training flyers we will add. So please ask your maintenance, engineering, manufacturing and other industrial related friends to follow us.

Not following us yet? Please choose your poison...


Right click link below, choose "Save Target As" to save file to your computer.

111 Protecting bearings from dust & water
115 Maintenance costs capital moneys
122 Ultrasonic level detectors
123 Chemical corrosion control
262 Electric motor problems
275 Helical rotor pumps - benefits and limitations (coming soon, please follow)
323 Tools to Focus on Plant Reliability (coming soon, please follow)
344 Control Loops - Masters of Automatic Control (coming soon, please follow)
364 Rolling bearing vibration detection (coming soon, please follow)
1101 Job descriptions tell tradesmen (coming soon, please follow)


The above Flyers are from our CD with 150 Maintenance training flyers on it. If you want to see what free maintenance flyers might come up in the future, or want to purchase all 150 today, please see the product page below.


Don
(Follow me on Industrial Skills Training Blog and on Twitter @IndTraining .)

Saturday, March 13, 2010

Please Follow This Industrial Skills Training Blog

By following this blog, not only will you keep up to date, you also will encourage me to add more.

WAHW5WJH2QMM
Thank you for your consideration.
Don (Follow me on twitter @indtraining, add me to LinkedIn)

Saturday, March 6, 2010

Want to connect with us (BIN95) and learn even more?

Youtube                          = http://www.youtube.com/user/bin952

LinkedIn                         = http://www.linkedin.com/profile?viewProfile=&key=410151

Industrial Group              = http://www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=79953

Twitter                            = http://twitter.com/IndTraining

Ning                               = http://reliability.ning.com/

Maint & Eng Group        = http://reliability.ning.com/group/industrialtraining

Facebook                       = http://www.facebook.com/bin95

Industrial Training Group = http://www.facebook.com/bin95#!/group.php?gid=222630907465

Follow, subscribe, blog, comment, connect, favorite, friend so you don't mis a thing. :>)
Don (Follow me on twitter @indtraining, add me to LinkedIn)

Sunday, February 21, 2010

Where are all the women engineers and other professional industrial women?

Last week, a female college instructor (Elaine) in our PLC training class, made the mention and question...


"Do you have women attend this PLC training often? I hardly ever get women in my industrial automation class."



I sadly replied ... "Only a couple over the years." Which got me remembering the first woman we brought into our maintenance department a couple decades ago. She was brought in from off the production floor to do PMs. (Preventive Maintenance :>). But she (Janet) was a go getter, she wanted to learn everything, fixing machines, fabricating, all of it. She inspired me to become a strong advocate of women in engineering (and other industrial fields). Especially when I taught her how to weld. It really opened my eyes. Remember, this was a couple decades ago. By the way, last time I ran into Janet, she was still in maintenance department. :>)

So today, I decided to place this post, as a Shout-Out to all professional women in our industry. My hat is off to you for dealing with the mind sets and prejudices, to continue to pursue your interest in maintenance and engineering fields.

If you are a maintenance woman, woman engineer, female electrician or any other industrial technical field, please comment on this post and say hi. (Tell us a little about yourself, let the world know, women are in our professions too.:>)


Don (Follow me on twitter @indtraining, add me to LinkedIn)

Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Maintenance Managers in the Pursuit of World-Class Performance




"A savvy maintenance manager can cause organizational change by financial presentations for resources to introduce proactive implementations. He also can use the daily management meeting with the proper departmental KPIs to illustrate and teach these lessons. He will also improve the management and control capabilities of the maintenance function by using the proper KPIs."

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This Article/Whitepaper below outlines in detail how a savvy maintenance manager can cause organizational change, and why. In today’s competitive economy, those not willing to succeed will cease to exist. This advanced knowledge and insight is invaluable for Maintenance Manager career planning.

This article was donated by Certified Plant maintenance Manager (CPMM), Dale Reiter who wants to encourage readers to contact him about this article dale.reiter(at)alcoa.com

  • What? MAINTENANCE AND QUALITY ?

INTRODUCTION

Maintenance and quality are two terms usually not associated. Normally, these terms are only mentioned together when equipment condition effects scrap rates. However, if maintenance managers become familiar with historical quality philosophies, there are some lessons that can be applied to maintenance.

As the quality movement grew, many companies mistakenly pursued exceedingly lofty quality goals. Excessive cost of mistakenly set high quality levels resulted in the inability to compete in the marketplace. The cost to produce excessive levels of quality eliminated profitability. There are levels of quality for which the customer will not bear the cost. Customers that purchase custom-tailored clothes are willing to pay much more for quality than the customer that is purchasing off-the-rack clothing at a discount store.

Quality definitions then expanded to include customer needs and wants. Quality grew to be defined as the precise product the customer desired. The customer (marketplace) defined the level of quality, the acceptable price, and the exact availability of the product.

What if there was a tremendous product developed, with perfect quality, and great availability (timing) that the customer was not aware? Would that mean that it was an inferior product? The customer could not identify something they did not know existed. The introduction of cell phone technology is such an example. It became apparent that allowing the customer to define quality, in many cases, would require the quality provider/creator to educate the customer.

To view this full article with pictures and formulas, please see ....
http://www.bin95.com/Maintenance-Managers.htm


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Saturday, January 9, 2010

Training Business in Recession: The Training Recession

Training Business in Recession: The Training Recession


Recession survival tips for Manufacturing Industry:

About the methods for US Manufacturing Industry to adjust for the knowledge vacuum caused by retiring baby boomers with training, while dealing with tight training budgets during a recession.

This article is in response to our survey of 200 companies who requested training quotes, but did not follow through with actual training for their employees in 2008-2010. Out of 50 who have responded at the time these recession articles where written , an amazing 40% indicated training budgets were cut, due to the current US economic decline.

...READ more, click here!